A French songbook (quotes)

Jóse Luis Ajzenmesser, journalist, radio program La Guagua, broadcast on www.fmurquiza.com, Buenos Aires (Argentina) : «  Your CD is wonderful. The choice of the tracks and the concept are excellent. And your idea of curiosity, as a form of creativity in the rough is great. Thank you for the music ! »

Jean-Efflam Bavouzet, pianist : “Due to the tender subtlety of their harmonies, I love the most beautiful bossa novas just as much as certain mazurkas by Chopin. The music produces a Pavlovian effect, plunging me immediately into an attitude of blissful contemplation, somewhat sad, but also with a feeling of pure happiness. The magnificent music of Chico Buarque, the inspired lyrics of Tu verras and the excellent arrangement by the Alzy Trio produce all the above emotions and warm my heart.”

Pierre Bigorgne, editor-in-chief, Grands Reportages magazine : “The arrangement of Billie Jean, an absolute cult song and a UFO in this French songbook, shows once again that rules are made to be broken. What would become of our liberty if that were not the case  ? What would become of creativity if there were no rule breakers  ? What would become of the epicurean Alzy Trio if it did not break away from its basic genre, bossa nova, in order better to seduce and surprise us  ? What could be more true to jazz than this “alzy” cover of a hit written by the king of pop. The Alzy guitars play exciting variations of the hypnotic bass guitar lick. One of the songs on this album asks what remains of our loves. The answer is Billie Jean, of course.

Jean-Paul Boutellier, Jazz à Vienne festival : “For me, I wish you love evokes the difference between melancholy and nostalgia. It is of course the second that best describes the subject here, which looks back over a happy past whose memories remain a moment of joy. The “stolen kisses” are the evanescent little secrets that inspired François Truffaut.

Michèle Caron, radio journalist, France Bleu : “What a joy to rediscover the lyrics of Tu verras, carried by a woman’s voice that is spellbinding, suave and dynamic, and accompanied by heartfelt music. A hymn to love that makes me want to rediscover the repertoire of that moving wordsmith who had rhythm in the blood. No one is the same after hearing this song.

Sheyla Costa, singer : “I like Un eté (Estate) that reminds me of my native Brazil. The soft harmonies and the bossa nova swing mixed into the jazz are pleasing. The vibrations are good and the energy is there. A nice interpretation of Nougaro.”

Marie-Hélène Fraïssé, radio journalist, France Culture : “When Cécile, ma fille was written, Claude Nougaro was just beginning his career. Dark, obstinate and… tender, as shown by the lyrics of this song, a hard-boiled guy who falls head over heels in love with a baby girl. His baby girl. Ever since, Claude has always been with us. He had blues, jazz and poetry in his blood. He was like a big brother, rebel and protector. I never pass in front of his brick house in Paris without my heart skipping a beat. Thank you, the Alzy Trio, for helping to keep the legend of this magnificent artist alive.”

Roberta Gambarini, jazz singer, USA : “I was able to hear a little of your concert. It sounded really great and Elsy Fleriag, the singer was really excellent.”

Benjamin Goldenstein, artistic director, Frémeaux & Associés (about I wish you love) : “Are desperate songs (the most beautiful according to some) all that remain of our loves  ? Or is there redemption through poetry which, when melded with the melodies that bare our hearts, cultivates from the ruins the essence of that which will remain the vital chord of all feeling, for entire generations of lovers and music lovers  ?

Phil Jones, USA : « Music is excellent and sound quality is first class. If you don’t mind, I will use your CD as one of our demonstration CDs to show off the sound quality of our speakers. By the way the bass sounds so acoustic, I can’t hear the amp and that’s a good thing ! »

Robert Latxague, journalist, Jazz Magazine : “The melody of Cécile, ma fille is everything, elegantly simple. Emotion just barely contained, true feeling expressed along the trails of an inner voyage, a desire, a moment in life. The lyrics by Nougaro exude the many fragrances of a young woman coming into being. Of course, his words and his notes echoed my own desires far beyond any rhyme or reason. No doubt because the Nougaro of that time, still a young man, stood, to my open eyes and ears, as a son of the south, where they play rugby, and as a child born of jazz, java and opera.

Jean-Christophe Martin, radio journalist, France Info : “It has been a while that Autumn leaves have been falling, twirling, dying and resuscitating, autumn leaves yet still so green. Blues for the fertile sadness of autumn, then the rite of spring and the joy, still there, for the music. A leaf falls, a few notes of music and an entire universe springs up, always the same, never the same. This time, it is the Alzy Trio that interprets this classic jazz tune for our greater pleasure.

Sandrine Mercier, radio journalist, France Inter (about Chanson des jumelles) : “The trade winds carried the twin sisters from the movie to South America. What were their names again  ? I have forgotten them, but not the tune, so heady and exuberant, composed by Michel Legrand. The two were so frivolous, mischievous and such a pain. Jacques Demy chose two sisters, Françoise Dorléac and Catherine Deneuve. A few years before, the first had starred with Belmondo in L’homme de Rio, in Brazil, and the second, later, with Yves Montand in Le Sauvage, on an island in Venezuela. And they were still so frivolous, mischievous and such a pain. It almost seems that the girls from Rochefort, along the Atlantic coast of France, had already set their sights on the South-American rhythms so dear to the Alzy Trio.”

Gérard Rouy, journalist : “I am particularly attracted by the music of Michel Legrand, represented by two songs in this French songbook. He is the only composer, with Joseph Kosma and Charles Trenet (and a few others) to have made a permanent stamp on the international repertoire of standards and evergreens, from which jazzmen looking for melodies have long drawn their inspiration.”

Yves Sportis, editor-in-chief, Jazz Hot magazine : “All these melodies are the background music of my life. Some of them since my birth. But I owe my first name to Yves Montand, the permanent “guest” at home. So I have a special spot in my heart for Autumn leaves, the song of my parents. Its nostalgia has always been there to envelop me like a spell of loyalty to friends, to ideas. And also like a promise of sadness when losing one of them. So, Bonjour tristesse.”

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